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this week ~ MLB Playoffs!
october 16, 2015


It’s an honor to make history but it's much more important that we build a better future.
new design
pitch perfect

Dr. Justine Siegal made history as the first woman to pitch batting practice for Major League Baseball. Now, the Oakland A’s have hired her on as the first female coach in the pros.

Justine may have been playing baseball since she was 5 years old, but her love of the sport has never been just about the game. Besides coaching gigs in college + the pros, she earned her PhD in sports psych + is the director of a Northeastern University program to promote social justice through sports. This year, the nonprofit Justine founded ~ Baseball For All ~ hosted the first-ever national baseball tournament for tween girls. {The Carolina Terminators took home the trophy.}

The A’s instructor expects to see female players go pro again soon. Her prediction for the next woman in the major leagues? A southpaw knuckleballer pitcher. It’s something to chew on as the MLB Playoffs go into full swing! Here are some thought-provoking stories from the annals of America’s favorite pastime, perfect for swapping with fellow fans.

Cheers!





Lizzie "Spike" Murphy
the queen of diamonds

Lizzie “Spike” Murphy_newsletter

"Playing ball is the same as everything else in life. Mind your own business and concentrate on what you are doing, and you will be alright."
source it! Lizzie “Spike” Murphy




~ a Rhode Island mill-town girl

~ a swimmer, runner + violinist who started playing men’s baseball at age 15

~ the first person to play on both the American + National Leagues’ All-Star Teams
{1922 + 1928}

Lizzie “Spike” Murphy had her name embroidered in capital letters on both sides of her uniform. She wanted fans to be able to identify the player they came to see ~ the first woman to play in the major leagues.

Lizzie wasn’t especially tall or built, at 5’6” + 122 lbs. But, the legendary first baseman started early + turned her hard chores {beating rugs + chopping wood} into a means of getting in shape. She was also famous for mental toughness. When a coach denied her a fair share of the proceeds from a game, she held out for a guaranteed contract. Which she got.

Playing in the pros was Lizzie’s passion, but fame did not bring fortune. She used to earn more money selling 10-cent autographed postcards of herself between innings than she did from her modest wages. When she retired from the game at 40, Lizzie was forced to work in the local wool mills to make ends meet + her standout career was largely forgotten.

Discover more about how the young "Spike" bartered her way onto the boys' teams...

Lizzie “Spike” Murphy




Lisa Fernandez
the fastpitch hall-of-famer

Lisa Fernandez_newsletter.jpg

"Who’s the one that—when no one else is watching—is really going to do something that’s going to
separate them?"

source it! Lisa Fernandez




~ a Long Beach kid whose dad played semi-pro baseball in Cuba

~ a 4-time UCLA All-American + 2-time national softball champion

~ a 2013 inductee into the Softball Hall of Fame

Lisa Fernandez is generally acknowledged to be the greatest fastpitch softball player of all time. But, when she was a tween in the Little Miss Softball league, her coach told her she didn’t have the build to be a pitcher. Lisa wasn’t about to let her height, arm-length or hand-size keep her from the mound. The extraordinary self-discipline she learned at home translated into an extraordinary career on the diamond.

Her senior season, she nabbed the Honda-Broderick Cup for the nation’s most outstanding female collegiate player after topping the NCAA in both pitching ERA {0.23} + batting average {.510}! Besides setting the Olympic record for most strikeouts in a game {25}, Lisa led Team USA to 3 golds in 1996, 2000 + 2004.

Lisa’s incredible fastpitch performances raised the worldwide profile of the sport before softball + baseball became the first events to be dropped from the Summer Olympics since polo was voted out in 1936. {There’s a bid to bring them back for the 2020 games!}

The distinguished UCLA alum has been stepping up to the plate as a Bruins assistant coach since 1997. Hear more of Lisa’s winning tips about how to get from "good" to "great"...

Lisa Fernandez




Mo’ne Davis
the tween pitching phenom

Mo’ne Davis_newsletter.jpg

"I throw my curveball like Clayton Kershaw’s and my fastball like Mo’ne Davis."
source it! Mo’ne Davis




~ an inner-city Philly girl scouted by a coach who spotted her playing a mean game of football at age 6

~ an all-around athlete who plays baseball {pitcher}, basketball {point guard} + soccer {goalie}

~ the first African-American girl to play in the Little League championships

The major influence on Mo’ne’s curveball just won Game 4 in the Dodgers’ series vs. the Mets. Clayton was the MLB’s MVP in 2014 ~ the same year that Mo’ne became the first female pitcher to score a win in the Little League World Series.

More than 5 million viewers tuned in to see Mo’ne’s signature fastball scorch past batters at a blazing 70 mph. The 13-year-old sensation’s historic start had a storybook ending ~ a shutout victory. Plus, a serious fan following.

Over the past year, Mo’ne has racked up a series of Ws for girls in sports. She was the youngest athlete ever to make the cover of Sports Illustrated + winner of an ESPY for Best Breakthrough Athlete. Spike Lee directed a "Throw Like a Girl" documentary short starring her + Disney announced they’re making her story into a movie. With a memoir out + her own line of M4D3 sneakers {to benefit girls in the developing world}, Mo’ne is turning her personal successes into a movement.

In June, Mo’ne’s team went on a civil rights tour. See how the history lesson upped her determination to be an impact player...

Mo’ne Davis




books for game-changers
Enjoy a history with a major-league message. Make an order through Quotabelle, and help us score more homerun stories!
coming soon…
market place

Queen Diamond Lizzie Murphy Story
Whole New Ball Game All American
Mo'ne Davis: Remember My Name: My Story from First Pitch to Game Changer
Throw Like a Girl: How to Dream Big & Believe in Yourself
Curveball: The Remarkable Story of Toni Stone the First Woman to Play Professional Baseball in the Negro League



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"Take your victories, whatever they may be. Cherish them, use them, but don't settle for them." 
 
 
"Challenges create needs and needs create deeds." 
 
 
"Let’s just put an end to this myth that women players cannot be friends. We can!" 
 




from our #citeseers
Notes from the construction company founder who became the first female + first Hispanic MLB owner when she helped bring the Rockies to Denver in 1993...

In the 70s...even when I saw a woman’s byline in the newspaper, it gave me an adrenaline rush. Especially when it was in the business section or the sports page. We cannot be observers. We have to get in the game.


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